Lectures

PGS, as currently practiced, is associated with inferior results and should not be offered routinely

Lecture Type: Conferences

PGS, as currently practiced, is associated with inferior results and should not be offered routinely

Norbert Gleicher, MD, FACOG

Speaker Bio Dr. Norbert Gleicher founded the Center for Human Reproduction (CHR) in 1981. He is a graduate of Tel Aviv Medical School, Israel, and completed his residency at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Dr. Gleicher was appointed to the facility as an Assistant Professor in charge of student and resident education in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and became Chief of the Section for Reproductive Immunology. Two years later, he moved to Chicago when he was offered the position of Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Mount Sinai Hospital Medical Center, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Associate Professor of Immunology/Microbiology at Rush Medical College. He held his position as Chairman for 10 years, until his resignation in 1990. Since then, he has held a variety of academic and administrative positions. Dr. Gleicher is currently Medical Director and Chief Scientist of CHR-New York. Dr. Gleicher has published hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific papers, abstracts and book chapters in the areas of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, as well as in areas of medical complications in pregnancy. He has edited some of the most prestigious textbooks in these specialties and has served as the Editor-in-Chief for the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology and Microbiology and the Journal of In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer, which was renamed the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics in 1992. Dr. Gleicher serves as ad hoc reviewer and editorial board member for many other medical journals. He is a Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and, in addition to many other societies and professional organizations, a member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). He was chosen by Chicago magazine and other organizations as being amongst the ‘best physicians’ in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, as well as obstetrics and gynecology, as designated by his peers. In January 2009, Dr. Gleicher was invited to give the prestigious Patrick Steptoe Memorial Lecture to the British Fertility Society, as a recognition of his lifelong contribution to the advancement in reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Abstract The premature introduction of PGS into routine IVF, likely, represented the largest misstep in the development of IVF. Now we are facing the risk of a repeat performance, as the development of more accurate techniques for single cell chromosomal analyses, once again, threatens the premature introduction of an untested procedure. While inadequate diagnostic technology, undoubtedly, was one reason for the failure of PGS in its earlier incarnation, it was not the only reason. Equally important, as an embryos election technique, PGS cannot be expected to show the same utility in all patients. Until benefits in specific patient populations are, unequivocally, established, PGS, therefore, should be considered experimental, and only offered under study conditions, and with appropriate informed consents.

Context

The premature introduction of PGS into routine IVF, likely, represented the largest misstep in the development of IVF. Now we are facing the risk of a repeat performance, as the development of more accurate techniques for single cell chromosomal analyses, once again, threatens the premature introduction of an untested procedure. While inadequate diagnostic technology, undoubtedly, was one reason for the failure of PGS in its earlier incarnation, it was not the only reason. Equally important, as an embryos election technique, PGS cannot be expected to show the same utility in all patients. Until benefits in specific patient populations are, unequivocally, established, PGS, therefore, should be considered experimental, and only offered under study conditions, and with appropriate informed consents.

VIDEO: PGS, as currently practiced, is associated with inferior results and should not be offered routinely


Recorded on: December 9, 2011

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